Description

Loggia
Loggia
Loggia
Loggia

A point of reference for Heraklion city, the Loggia, on Lions Square (in 25th August pedestrian street), was a meeting point for the nobles and lords of the city, where they discussed various economic, political and commercial matters during the Venetian rule.

This is one of the most elegant architectural monuments of the Venetian period, a fine sample of palladian style. The way it is today is due to the fourth consecutive construction, dating back to 1628 with Fragiskos Morozini, known form the fountain in the centre of Heraklion that bears his name, being in charge.

The building is of rectangular shape and has two levels. There are Doric style pillars on the ground level, while on the upper level the pillars are of Ionic style.

After the city was taken over by the Turks, the Loggia lost its glamour and the old prestige and was turned into the seat of the treasury clerk, while its use was not determined even after the island was freed. It was given to the municipality in 1905, and its restoration was decided in order to house the municipal offices in 1934.

The armory (Aremria), which today also houses municipal offices, used to be next to the Loggia.

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