Description

Cape Lefkatas
Cape Lefkatas
Cape Lefkatas
Cape Lefkatas
Cape Lefkatas

Cape Lefkatas, one of the most famous rocks in antiquity and to which allegedly the island owes its name, is located on the southwestern tip of the island and 50 km away from the centre of Lefkada town (1 hour and 25 minutes’ drive).

It owes its name to its white colour during sunset, while many people claim that it comes from Lefkos, the companion of Odysseus or Lefkatas, a young man who in his attempt to avoid Apollo that persecuted him, jumped off the cliff.

Also known as Kavos tis Kyras (Lady's Cape), Kavos tis Nyras or Kavo Doukato, it impresses visitors with its towering steep rocks emerging from the sea causing admiration and awe with the wild and at the same time beautiful natural landscape. In fact, according to tradition it is this cape that poet Sappho fell from when Faonas did not respond to her loving feelings.

Around 1,200 BC the islanders used the Cape as a place of sacrifices to the gods, while much later (around 400 BC) it was used as a place of punishment for offenders. Before throwing them of the rock, they tied feathers and birds to their body so that the descent would be "smoother". Boats waited at sea, so that if they were saved, they would take them away.

Since 1890 Doukato lighthouse operates at the Cape, with a height of 15 m. and a focal height of 70 m. Its operation, according to a sign by the Lighthouses Service of the Naval Headquarters, was achieved using oil as energy source. During World War II, it remained closed and reopened in 1945, to be destroyed by an earthquake in 1950 and function temporarily as an automatic acetylene torch until 1956. Since 1986 it operates on electrical power.